Japanese Fender Serial Numbers

Choose the Fender Serial Number: Most notably, production dates have been penciled or stamped on the butt end of the heel of the neck of most guitars and basses. There were periods of time when this was not consistently done, between and , and there are certainly other examples of short periods of time, and individual pieces, where the dating was simply omitted. While this neck dating is useful in roughly determining the age of a guitar, it is certainly not definitive. The neck date simply refers to the date that the individual component was produced. Given the modular nature of Fender’s production techniques, an individual neck may have been produced in a given year, placed in the manufacturing warehouse and remained in stock for a period of time, and then subsequently paired with a body to create a complete guitar in the following year. So, obviously a neck date, while being helpful in providing a date range of production, it cannot be a definitive reference.

How to Date your Fender Guitar by Serial Number

In fact, it was likely that your parents were steering you in the direction of accordion lessons. The Beatles — and of course others — stopped all that. Suddenly, electric guitars were 1 on every kids Christmas list. Companies that had been manufacturing Accordions for 20 years, retooled for electric guitars. EKO was at the forefront, and within 2 years they were shipping over 10, electric guitars to USA per year.

Dyna Gakki began production in in the city of Nagano, Japan. They manufactured guitars for Fender Japan and Greco, so they couldn’t have been a terrible manufacturer as Fender is very choosy about outsourcing their product.

About Guitars Buying a new guitar is a considerable investment for most of us. An instrument is all about inspiration. You are the musician and the guitar is the tool you use to express your feelings and music. This has nothing to do with what models you choose or how much they cost. Some basic knowledge about the different wood types, neck and body profiles, pickups etc will help you in making the best choice.

However, over the last decade or so, the MIMs has gotten a considerable face lift and the overall quality is very high. In fact, the reason why they are cheaper, ha sless to do with quality but rather lower labour costs, cheaper type of laquer and apply methods etc.

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This is one of the most frustrating questions from the MIJ collector. People often make the mistake of citing the American or European importer as the ‘maker’ of the guitar, when in fact several Japanese manufacturers were producing badged guitars out of their plants and shipping them to America and Europe to sell.

Japanese manufacturers made multiple badges at the same plant, many of whom resemble each other closely. Some manufacturers merged or changed hands over the years which added to the confusion, sometime merging with another maker, only to pick up their name later.

The other vintage controllers, the G and G, are well-built, fine guitars. But they cannot escape the feel of being really well made Fender copies, no matter how nice they are.

Return to the Main Index. Sometimes there just isn’t enough information on electric instruments and amps to allow them to be properely dated. And many people ask me to try and determine the year of their old amplifier, or to help them with the year of their older off-brand electric guitar. Since I primarily collect amps by Fender, and guitars by Gibson, Fender, Martin, National, Epiphone, Gretsch and Rickenbacker, I really can’t help them with these other less popular brands.

As you have probably noticed, there is plenty of information here to help date the brands that I am interested in. But where does that leave everyone else? Well I’m not one to leave you out in the informational cold, so here’s something that I use quite often in dating amplifiers and electric guitars. It’s called the “source-date code”, and it can help determine the approximate age of an electric instrument by the date its components were manufactured.

Japanese Manufacturers of Made in Japan Badged Electric Guitars From 1960 to 1980

Don’t let anyone try to convince you that there is a Strat Plus, they just did not exist. It was owned by a former Fender employee who recently passed away. The strings, I am certain, were the original from 87, as they were rusty and hard to pull through the nut. I have owned ‘s of Strat Plus’, as well as helping s of people to identify their guitars.

Guitars. Buying a new guitar is a considerable investment for most of us. To get the best possible experience, it is therefore important that you’ve done some research and decided on what kind of model you’re looking for.

Tweet on Twitter From one perspective, flamenco and heavy metal might seem as far apart as the sun and the moon, but if you think about the hyperbolic emotion involved in both genres, there is a certain spritual connection. Born in East L. Growing up in a guitar-oriented culture, Mr. Rico came from a guitar household. His father, Bernardo Mason Rico, was a guitar-maker, with a shop where he built guitars, vihuelos, requintos, bajo sextos and other instruments for the Mexican-oriented musicians in L.

He also sold guitarmaking parts through the mail. Rico began playing guitar at an early age, as primarily a flamenco and classical guitarist. I got to meet all the players coming through, including young Paco de Lucia and Montoya. He and I were like godfather to son. I was very nervous but it is a great memory.

Do Black Color Shirts Protect From UV Rays

But the truth is that the color itself is not a factor to block away UV radiation. But absorbing the light energy does not mean filtering the UV away. In the one minute clip below you will see how black absorbs more light energy and has higher temperature. White and fair colors reflect the light. When you see a black shirt, it means most of the light was absorbed and very little was reflected.

Find out all you need to know need to know about the best and most rare vintage guitars from the Sixties! Besides bigger brands such as Fender and Gibson, several smaller brands flourished in this decade, and names such as Airline, Supro, Teisco and Hagstrom are today very desirable.

Don’t let anyone try to convince you that there is a Strat Plus, they just did not exist. It was owned by a former Fender employee who recently passed away. The strings, I am certain, were the original from 87, as they were rusty and hard to pull through the nut. I have owned ‘s of Strat Plus’, as well as helping s of people to identify their guitars. I also saw where Shell Pink was listed as an available color from Fender in color code 56 but not in any of the Strat Plus brochures.

This is the oldest Strat Plus I have come across yet, as it came off the assembly-line July 27th, ! Scroll up to see John’s Custom Shop work log. The backs of the pickups do not even have any stickers with the part or patent numbers. Instead they are hand scribed most likely done by Jeff Lace when in high school.

The numbers on the pickups indicate the order which they were manufactured! The soldering is very interesting, almost like they were trying to decide how to wire them up. Has the big fat resistor on the TBX. Another interesting feature, beside the split Wilkinson nut, is the starred Sperzil locking tuners.

Dating Fender Guitars

What’s the difference and how can you tell? The serial number of your guitar will begin with one of the above lettering sequences. Fender Japan used all of the above lettering sequences for the serial numbering of their guitars and basses over the years, and knowing this first will help you determine the year of manufacture.

guitars, you will find the serial number just below this stamp, also on the heel of the neck. On Telecasters and certain other models, you will find the serial number on the bridge.

This is a very quick history, and mostly from memory, so take it all with a grain of salt and try to verify what you can from other sources. However, every attempt has been made to provide only verifiable and true information, in an attempt to set the record straight and dispell some modern “myths” about Ibanez model guitars. They were not forgeries, as they were never sold with misleading logos or with the intent to deceive.

Due to their high quality, Ibanez guitars and those made under other brands, such as Greco and Aria, quickly earned a reputation around the world as quality instruments at a great value. There is a form of urban legend that circulates in the guitar community that has many variations, but usually involves either Gibson or Fender suing Ibanez, Aria, or some other Japanese manufacturer, with the intent to stop that company from manufacturing superior copies. The truth is less glamourous. Only one company ever sued another, and it was Norlin the owner of the Gibson brand at the time suing Hoshino owner of the Ibanez brand and the suit was focused only on the “open book” headstock shape common to Gibson guitars and replicated on the Ibanez guitars.

The suit was brought in , but by then Ibanez had already changed the headstock shape on its copy models, so the suit was settled out of court. No other company was ever sued by any other company. However, this episode has given rise to the term “lawsuit” guitar, which is used to describe any Japanese copy guitar made in the shape of an American manufacturer’s model. The Ibanez Golden Age, – Beginning about , Hoshino began introducing original guitar and bass models to the market.

At first, their original designs were subtle variations on the copy models. For example, the “Custom Agent” model was basically a Les Paul with a fancy scroll headstock, a fancy pick guard, and, yes, fancy inlays on the neck and body.

Welcome to the Tokai Guitar Registry

Bass 6 , to Typical wear on a ‘s Fender maple fingerboard. Fingerboard Material Maple fingerboard, s: This was the standard neck on all models until when the Jazzmaster was introduced with a rosewood fingerboard; the rest of the Fender models changed to rosewood fingerboards in mid Rosewood fingerboard, “Slab” Brazilian , to

Tips to help you accurately date your Fender Japan guitar First, you want to determine whether your guitar is from the JV, SQ, MIJ or CIJ series.

I often get asked, how old is my Fender guitar? Most of the time this question can’t be answered specifically. The Fender numbers tell the story of the company over the years. Unfortunately, the serial number placement is sporadic and many ID numbers over lap between years and models. In many instances, there is no exact known date for a specific guitar. That is why I decided to write this article.

I want to help you understand how to tell the age of your Fender as well as any Fender you see.

Dating Fender Guitars

Well, Fender stopped using Fuji Gen Gakki to build their guitars. They switched to Tokai and Dyna to build their Japanese guitars after These guitars are often called Crafted in Japan or CIJ guitars because of the stamp on the neck heel. These Japanese Fender guitars made after used a single letter followed by five or six digits. Well, there’s a catch as with all Fender serial numbers. Fender ran out of numbers!

– 20th year of ! (now over 10M hits!) We salute our Nation’s military, past and present. IN WONDERFUL ALBANY, NY, USA. Updated: Wed, Nov 14th,

History[ edit ] V. Squier Company [ edit ] Jerome Bonaparte Squier , a young English immigrant who arrived in Battle Creek, Michigan , in the latter part of the 19th century, was a farmer and shoemaker who had learned the fine European art of violin making. He moved to Boston in , where he built and repaired violins with his son, Victor Carroll Squier. To this day, their violins are noted for their exceptional varnishes, and they command high prices as fine examples of early U. Squier ranks among the best-known U.

As his business grew, Squier moved the company to Lake Ave. With a limited market for violins in Battle Creek, however, Squier astutely sought relationships with national music schools and famous violinists. Up to , the best violin strings were made in Europe. Victor Squier started making his own hand-wound violin strings, and the business grew so quickly that he and his employees improvised a dramatic production increase by converting a treadle sewing machine into a string winder capable of producing 1, uniformly high-quality strings per day.

Squier violin strings , banjo strings and guitar strings became well known nationwide and were especially popular among students because of their reasonable price.

The Fender® New American Standard-(Japanese)


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